Screening of microRNAs

Nanowire scaffolds for the screening of microRNAs from patient-derived tumor-organoid and urine in patients with central nervous system tumors. Credit: Takao Yasui & Atsushi Natsume

A recent study by Nagoya University researchers revealed that microRNAs in urine could be a promising biomarker to diagnose brain tumors. Their findings, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, have indicated that regular urine tests could help early detection and treatment of brain tumors, possibly leading to improved patient survival.

Early diagnosis of brain tumors is often difficult, partly because most people undergo a brain CT or MRI scan only after the onset of neurological deficits, such as immobility of limbs, and incapability of speech. When brain tumors are detected by CT or MRI, in many cases, they have already grown too large to be fully removed, which could lower patients’ survival rate. From this perspective, accurate, easy, and inexpensive methods of early brain tumor detection are strongly desired.

As a diagnostic biomarker of cancerous tumors, microRNAs (tiny molecules of nucleic DOI: 10.1021/acsami.1c01754

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